And Then There Were Three

September 1st, 2011

Missing Pillow Poster

Our Home Office

November 22nd, 2010

Our White Board

Our food cache/whiteboard

*secret stuff blurred

Well, I have a little free time now, so I finally did the modification to the camper we’ve been talking about for ages. This morning, I went to Lowe’s and picked up a piece of ‘marker board’ or ‘shower board’ paneling. For $10, I got almost three times what I needed, but maybe I’ll find a use for the leftover bits before we leave Campbellsville.

Our refrigerator came with paneling that has wood grained wallpaper to match the interior of the camper. So, my quickie project of the day was to remove that paneling and replace it with hideous, white shower board. Why? Now we have a white board in our camper! Well, two actually. One on the fridge door and one on the freezer door.

I also grabbed a pack of dry erase markers with built in magnets and erasers that stick to the range hood above the stove. In theory, we can now make a grocery list as we run out of things without having to keep track of a notepad. Also, we can use it to scribble down ideas for FreeCampsites.net and not lose the darn notepad before we get around to implementing them.

A whiteboard is one of the things I miss the most from a career in IT. In my first management position, we had an 8’x4′ whiteboard that was our main organizational tool.  I’ve always needed to draw ugly pictures with incorrect labels when designing a new project whether it was software or something more hands on.

I know… there should be pictures. Before I got around to taking any, we had already covered it in scribblings regarding freecampsites.net. As such, if we had an IP lawyer, I’m sure he’d have a fit were we to post images of our plans. Actually, I’m just lazy.
Update: Picture added – super secret plans have been blurred!

Wonder if having a whiteboard in the kitchen will convince the IRS that it’s really a home office?

Two Years of Two People and Two Cats in Two Hundred Square Feet

December 5th, 2009

As of December 1st, we have been living in our truck camper for 2 years. I can’t believe I almost let it slip by nor can I believe that it has been that long. It just seems so natural anymore. Its home no matter where it is parked. And, regardless of where that is, we are in a much better place than we were on Nov 30, 2007.

Back then, we were in soul sucking, yet somewhat prestigious jobs and running the middle class treadmill. Well, I guess that by then we were only walking on it. We had already purchased the truck and camper. We had gotten rid of most everything we owned. We had had the camper for a couple of days and were moving what little of our stuff that remained into it. We were still working but only because we wanted to earn some additional money. At the very least, I wanted to make sure that I made the difference between what my Xterra sold for and what my truck cost back before we left.

Where our desks lived.
The building we used to work in.
The place we used to work. Our desks and the building.

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Life in the back of a truck (part 4)

April 9th, 2009

This is part of an ongoing series on what it’s like to live in a truck camper fulltime. You may read other articles here:

  1. Part One – The fulltime lifestyle
  2. Part Two – Why a truck camper?
  3. Part Three – Weights & Dealing with them
  4. Part Four – Boondocking resource conservation

Gordon recently posed a question over at the Truck Camper Magazine blog that seemed like a great idea for the next part of our Life in the back of a truck series. He’s curious just how long his readers can boondock and what tricks they use to manage it. I got a bit long winded, but here’s my response.

The resources we have to work with are:

  • 46 gallons of fresh water
  • ~300 amp hours of battery in 2 Trojan T-1275 12V batteries
  • 60 pounds of propane in 2 30# tanks
  • A Honda eu2000i generator
  • ~4.5 gallons of gasoline plus whatever is in the scooter and generator (up to around 2 gallons if both are full)

Doesn’t sound like much, does it? Still, we manage to do fairly well when we find a place we want to stay for a while. It takes a little effort to conserve resources, but we manage to live quite comfortably for up to a two week stretch without running out of anything or breaking out a military desert survival handbook. Just how do we make these resources last and what sacrifices does it take, you ask? Well, read on to get a taste of the Hitek Homeless lifestyle!

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Vicksburg

February 11th, 2009

ms_Vicksburg1.jpg

During our trip down the Natchez Trace, we took a daytrip a bit west towards Vicksburg. Jenn and I are both into museums and historic attractions, but neither of us is all that into the nuts and bolts of particular battles. So, why would we go to Vicksburg, where you spend several hours driving around the battlefield and reading about the intricate details of the battle including the number of casualties at each battery of guns? Well, mostly because we have an America the Beautiful pass and hate to pass up a chance to get into something for free that might entertain us for the day.

The military park really is a pretty drive and not a bad way to spend the day. However, after the first six or eight miles, I think we were both pretty well bored with the dry descriptions of troop movements and casualty counts. Don’t get me wrong, this era of our history is very important and shouldn’t be discounted, but I really had a hard time reading similar descriptions repeatedly, none of which you could really sink your teeth into except perhaps the description of tunneling into earthworks in order to blow them up, which is something I thought had died out a few hundred years earlier. This same area had the wonderfully colorful description of a slave who was ‘blown to freedom’ when a mine was touched off below him.

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